Viewing entries tagged
Marijuana history

Moments in Cannabis History: Cannabis Law in the Netherlands  


Moments in Cannabis History: Cannabis Law in the Netherlands 


As recently as 5 years ago, a trip to Amsterdam was the best option for an American looking to experience legal cannabis. As such, it was a mythical place in my eyes growing up on the east coast, and that legendary status will remain immortalized in such timeless works as Pulp Fiction. But Amsterdam wasn’t always the cannabis mecca it is today.

Prohibition and Propaganda: Part 4

Prohibition and Propaganda: Part 4

Harry Anslinger must have been feeling pretty good about the progress of his war on cannabis at the dawn of the 1960s. Despite some writers, artists, and jazz musicians going against the grain, the cultural and legal prohibition against cannabis use had really never been stronger. Simple possession was a crime punishable by decades in prison, and no doubt as a result of this, as well as decades of propaganda, drug use was not something to discuss at all in polite mainstream America.

Prohibition and Propaganda: Part 3

Prohibition and Propaganda: Part 3

During the very decade in which Anslinger’s ideas found their tightest grip on culture, in which cannabis had become as much socially taboo as it was illegal, the seeds were already planted these ideas to suffer a mass rejection amongst a new generation. 

Prohibition and Propaganda: Part 2

Prohibition and Propaganda: Part 2

As discussed in part one, while Americans used cannabis medicinally, purely medical use wasn’t really on Americas radar in the 19th century. Recreational cannabis, however, was used in much of the rest of the world – including Mexico. Mexican immigrants in this period introduced recreational cannabis to an American culture, which by its own account at least, knew nothing about using cannabis this way.

Prohibition and Propaganda: Part 1

Prohibition and Propaganda: Part 1

According to the ACLU in 2010, black Americans were 3.73 times more likely to be arrested for cannabis possession than white Americans, with consumption rates roughly even between the two groups. In some states such as Iowa and Minnesota, black residents are about 8 times as likely to be arrested for cannabis. These same ACLU statistics show that decriminalization, in this case in Massachusetts, did not lower the racial disparity in cannabis arrests.